Events

Feb 8
"Talking Black In America" Film Screening5:00 p.m.

The linguistics department will present the first of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This film talks about African American...
February 8 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, Room 156

The linguistics department will present the first of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This film talks about African American English, and it portrays the unique circumstances that shaped the language variety now spoken by the descendants of enslaved Africans brought to the U.S. and this group’s incredible impact on American life and language. The hope is to open people's eyes to language variation and validity of AAE in the US, and how speech varieties from the African American community reflect the imprint of African language systems, the influences of regional British and Southern American dialects, and the creativity and resilience of people living through oppression, segregation and the fight for equality.

Feb 11
“Letting My Heart Be Broken: Healing Cultural Trauma”5:00 p.m.

Our society is deepening its understanding of raciality, racism and intergenerational trauma.  As we increasingly awaken to the necessity of acknowledging the tragedy of...
February 11 5:00 p.m.

Our society is deepening its understanding of raciality, racism and intergenerational trauma.  As we increasingly awaken to the necessity of acknowledging the tragedy of the African Holocaust, we also begin to consider ways of collective healing.  Letting My Heart Be Broken focuses on the history of American slavery from an Africanist psychological point of view.  Slavery is also reviewed as an archetypal, somatic, and emotional collective event that has defined cultural intergenerational trauma. Uncovering the poison of racialized psychological and political relations gives us the opportunity to discover the remedy for this poison. The adoption of selected Jungian psychology theories into our society did not allow for the acceptance of the ethnic diversity that makes up America. Our American psyche finds itself struggling with this absence while it seeks better ways to acknowledge us as one race with a multitude of ethnicities requiring respect for all our differences. We truly are a pantheon. Our 21st century requires movement away from 19th century racialized psychology theories that never spoke the language of healing racial cultural trauma of our American psyche. During our time together we will discuss how we have now arrived at that moment of potential collective racial healing.  

Dr. Fanny Brewster is a Jungian analyst, and a professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is a writer of nonfiction including African Americans and Jungian Psychology: Leaving the Shadows (Routledge, 2017), Archetypal Grief: Slavery’s Legacy of Intergenerational Child Loss (Routledge, 2018) and The Racial Complex: A Jungian Perspective on Culture and Race (Routledge, 2019). Her poems have been published in Psychological Perspectives Journal where she was the Featured Poet. Dr. Brewster is an international lecturer and workshop presenter on Jungian related topics that address culture, diversity, and creativity. She is a faculty member at the New York C. G. Jung Foundation and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. 

Feb 15
"Signing Black In America" Film Screening5:00 p.m.

The linguistics department will present the second of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This is the first film about Black...
February 15 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, Room 156

The linguistics department will present the second of two films about being Black in the US as it relates to spoken and signed languages. This is the first film about Black American Signed Language.

Feb 16
CSWS Noon Talk with Jinsun Yang, Sociologynoon

“Creating a Non-gender Binary and Queer/Women-centered Sports Space: Strategies and Experience of Korean ‘Queer Women Games.’” Studies on sex...
February 16 noon

“Creating a Non-gender Binary and Queer/Women-centered Sports Space: Strategies and Experience of Korean ‘Queer Women Games.’”

Studies on sex segregation in sports have demonstrated that gender equity policies can uphold the male supremacy and heteronormativity of sports culture when they accommodate the binary and essentialist logic of gender difference. While sex-integrated sports and trans/gender-inclusive policies have been designed and explored as pathways toward gender equity in sports, organizational strategies to reform the binary gender system in sports have been little investigated. In this study, I introduce an annual sports competition, Korean Queer Women Games (QWG) as an experimental sports space undertaking organizational actions and collective practices against sexist sports culture. I call QWG’s aims to build a ‘non-gender binary’ and ‘queer/women-centered’ sports space distinct from the mainstream sports structure policing gender and centering males. Interviews suggest that queer/women were considered as a default identity in QWG and participants could exert their capacity for excellence and joy without discouragement and self-censorship of their ability and identity. Findings illuminate that organizational strategies and collective practices can reform sexist sports structures and two distinct strategies, advocating women as a marginalized identity and rejecting binary sex system, can be integrated at the practice level.