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June 15, 2020

Student Award Winners

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2020 Departmental Graduate Awards:

To honor the life and work of Norman Sundberg, the Norman D. Sundberg Fellowship in Psychology is given to outstanding Psychology doctoral students whose research focus is on cultural, community, clinical or personality assessment issues. The GEC is pleased to announce that this year’s winners are Cameron Kay, Monika Lind and Vinita Vader!
To honor the life and work of Beverly Fagot, the Beverly Fagot Dissertation Fellowship is given to an outstanding Psychology doctoral student who has advanced to candidacy and has a research focus in the area of social development and/or developmental psychopathology. The GEC is pleased to announce that this year’s winner is Jackie O’Brien!
Thanks to a generous gift from George Gregores, in honor of his son who graduated with dual degrees in Psychology and Political Science in 2010, we are able to offer the Gregores Graduate Student Research Award. The GEC is pleased to announce that this year’s winners are Alexis Adams-Clark, Raleigh Goodwin, and Brendan Cullen!

Every year, the department’s Distinguished Teaching Award is given to a Psychology graduate student (or students) who have demonstrated excellence in undergraduate classroom teaching. This year, the GEC is pleased to announce that the winner is Jeff Peterson!

We are also delighted to celebrate the undergraduate award winner

Rennie Kendrick won the Aaron Novick Thesis Award for her honors thesis completed in Dasa Zeithamova’s lab. Kendrick is also honored as one of the Oregon Six students, who are voted by their peers in Phi Beta Kappa as the most outstanding of those elected to membership that year.

Congratulations to our graduate and undergraduate students on winning these awards!

May 23, 2020

Congratulations to the Awardees from the Undergraduate Research Symposium!

Undergraduate Research Symposium

Congratulations to the undergraduates who won Psychology awards for posters they submitted to UO’s 2020 Undergraduate Research Symposium! Two students tied for the Psychology Grand Prize, given to the best overall poster. This award will be shared by Alex Boxberger, for a poster about “The effect of maternal borderline personality disorder symptoms on child externalizing problems, as mediated by parenting stress and maternal warmth,” and by Amy Chen, for the poster “Individual differences in memory self-efficacy and learning ability.”

Psychology’s Methodological Excellence Award went to Joshua Pearman‘s poster about “What parts of status matter? Comparing respect and admiration to social influence,” and the Innovation and Independence Award in Psychology went to Clare Brinkman, for the poster “Naturalistic perspective taking: Themes found in people’s naturalistic accounts.”

These students, who were selected by a faculty committee, will receive monetary awards. The department is very proud of its high level of undergraduate involvement in research and congratulates these four students for their outstanding posters.

March 4, 2020

Undergraduate Research Featured in Washington D.C.

Congratulations to UO undergraduate student Rennie Kendrick, who was selected to participate in Posters on the Hill, a Washington, D.C. event showcasing innovative student work and highlighting the value of federal investments in undergraduate research.

Kendrick will be presenting a poster on memory and innovative thinking, the subject of her honors thesis. Her plans include meeting with members of Oregon’s congressional delegation. Assistant professor Dasa Zeithamova-Demircan is helping Kendrick with the project, part of their work in the UO’s Brain and Memory Lab.

You can read more here.

February 13, 2020

DuBrow Wins Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Sarah DuBrow has been named a 2020 Sloan Research Fellow! The Sloan Fellowships are prestigious awards given to outstanding early-stage scholars in the natural sciences. Congratulations, Dr. DuBrow!

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation congratulates the winners of the 2020 Sloan Research Fellowships. These 126 early-career scholars represent the most promising scientific researchers working today. Their achievements and potential place them among the next generation of scientific leaders in the U.S. and Canada. Winners receive $75,000, which may be spent over a two-year term on any expense supportive of their research.

November 10, 2019

Prof Freyd’s DARVO Concept Featured on South Park

DARVO on South Park

DARVO on South Park

Professor Jennifer Freyd’s concept of “Deny, Attack, Reverse Victim and Offender”, or DARVO, in a perpetrator’s response to accusation was featured in a recent episode of the Comedy Central show South Park. Now that’s what we call effective Science Communication! Congrats, Professor Freyd, on your conceptualization reaching the mainstream!

August 14, 2018

Dr. Freyd Receives APA Award

Congratulations to Dr. Jennifer Freyd, who received an award from the Trauma Psychology division of the American Psychological Association! (more…)

June 5, 2018

Award-winning Undergraduate Students

We are delighted to announce the following winners of our 2018 Undergraduate Awards!

(more…)

May 11, 2018

Award-winning Faculty Members

Three of our outstanding faculty members have won awards recently celebrating their impressive careers!

Dr. Dare Baldwin is a recipient of a 2018 Faculty Research Award from the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation for her work on “Harnessing Pupillometry to Monitor Infants’ Auditory Health.”

Dr. Elliot Berkman has been awarded the Graduate Mentor Excellence award from the graduate school for his laudable skills as a mentor for graduate students, postdocs, and early career faculty.

Dr. Jennifer Freyd has earned her second fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University to pursue the research project “Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Sexual Violence: Individual, Institutional and Structural Forces.”

Congratulations to our faculty!

May 9, 2018

Three Minute Thesis Competition

Update: Our departmental winner, Sarah Donaldson, earned second place in the campus-wide 3MT finals during Grad Forum. Congrats, Sarah! Pics of our students, Sarah and Cameron Kay are below. Psychology was the only department with 2 finalists.


The Department hosted a successful Three-Minute Thesis (#3MT) Competition last week. Titles and abstracts of the presentations are below. The winner, Sarah Donaldson, will compete with students from other disciplines at Grad ForumFriday May 11 in the EMU (prelim rounds at 10:00). Sarah, Cameron Kay, and Jeff Peterson – plus a whole bunch of other grads – will all be participating in the Forum!

Congrats, all, on this excellent work!


Testosterone, Cortisol, and Risk-Taking Behaviors in Adolescents

Sarah Donaldson (Winner!)

Current evidence suggests that testosterone’s (T) influence on risk-taking behaviors is moderated by levels of cortisol (C), a “stress hormone” released by the HPA axis. Specifically, T has a positive association with risk-taking when levels of C are low. While this interaction has been demonstrated in adults, no work to-date has investigated this model in adolescents. We obtained baseline saliva samples from 149 adolescents, ages 11-17 years, who then played a simulated driving game (the Yellow Light Game; YLG) as a behavioral measure of risk. In the YLG, participants make decisions about whether to “STOP” or “GO” at several consecutive intersections, and any “GO” decisions involves a risk of crashing with another car in the game. Results showed the opposite pattern, namely that testosterone predicted a decrease in risk-taking when levels of C were low. Future work will explore this interaction and how it relates to brain activity across adolescent development.

 

The trident of Westeros: Morality and the Dark Triad in fictional characters

Cameron Kay

Coined by Paulhus and Williams (2002), the Dark Triad comprises three related—yet distinct—personality traits: Machiavellianism, subclinical narcissism, and subclinical psychopathy. Machiavellianism refers to a tendency to exhibit cynicism, amorality, and manipulativeness, whereas narcissism refers to a tendency towards vanity, entitlement, and superiority. Psychopathy, in contrast, refers to a combination of impulsivity and a lack of empathy. These three traits have often been linked to immorality. However, it hasn’t been shown that those high in the Dark Triad traits are necessarily perceived to be less moral. In a sample of undergraduate students, we found that fictional characters rated as being high in the Dark Triad traits were considered to be less moral than those characters rated as being low in the Dark Triad traits. This effect was greatest for psychopathy, followed by Machiavellianism, and, lastly, narcissism. A similar pattern was found in a complementary study using non-fictional people.

 

Intergroup Empathic Accuracy: To Use or Not To Use Stereotypes

Sara Lieber

Empathic accuracy is the similarity between what a perceiver infers a target is thinking at a specific moment and the target’s actual thought. Intergroup contexts are important for investigating empathic accuracy, and factors influencing it, within since perceptual inaccuracies have been associated with worse intergroup outcomes (Holoien et al., 2015). The only intergroup context in which empathic accuracy has been studied used new mothers as targets and found that using stereotypes to infer the targets’ thoughts was associated with better empathic accuracy (Lewis et al., 2012). However, this relationship likely varies depending on the intergroup context since the accuracy of stereotypes varies among groups. The current study investigated white perceivers’ inferences for the thoughts of Middle Eastern men. Our results indicated that perceivers’ use of the words spoken by the men during their interviews to infer the men’s thoughts was associated with better empathic accuracy, while using stereotypes was not.

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