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October 7, 2016

ADAPT Lab Research Featured at the White House

The ADAPT lab presents their E.A.R.S. tool at the White House

The ADAPT lab presents their E.A.R.S. tool at the White House. Credit: @ADAPT_UO


Research from the University of Oregon was presented at the White House as part of The Opportunity Project, an initiative focused on using open data to improve the lives of American citizens. Members of the ADAPT lab, including lab director Dr. Nick Allen, postdoctoral researcher Michelle Byrne, and graduate student Monika Lind, presented their “Effortless Assessment of Risk States” (E.A.R.S.) tool. This tool uses smartphone data to provide life-saving information to people in the midst of mental health crises. Click here to read more about the Opportunity Project.

September 27, 2016

We’re Hiring Two Assistant Professors

Straub Hall Foyer

Straub Hall Foyer

The Department of Psychology is pleased to announce two open positions at the Assistant Professor rank, one in cognitive-neuroscience and the other in social-personality.

Come join our team of outstanding researchers and teachers who love to collaborate on innovative projects!

September 17, 2016

Neville’s Research Featured on PBS

PBS NOVA: School of the FutureResearch from Helen Neville’s Brain Development Lab is featured on a new PBS NOVA film, School of the Future. The film highlights the Health & Human Services project, the two-generation approach of the work, and the way it uses selective attention as a neurobiological target for intervention.

You can read more here, and watch the full video here.

September 3, 2016

Fall Departmental Events

Department of Psychology

We’re pleased to announce the Fall lineup of events!

We’ll be meeting Friday afternoons from 2:30 pm to 4 pm, followed by happy hours at Falling Sky Pizzeria in the EMU on the first event each month.

The location of the talks will be announced shortly. Stay tuned for updates!

 


October 14 – Leona Tyler Lecture: Hiro Yoshikawa

October 21 – Psych FYP Presentations (*please note: departmental members only)

October 28 – Psych Colloquium: Morten Christiansen

November 4  – Psych FYP Presentations (*please note: departmental members only)

November 11 – Psych Faculty Research Blitz & Department Celebration 

November 18 – Psych/CTN/ION Colloquium: Sarah Jayne Blakemore (*please note: time is TBA; likely late morning)

December 2  – Special Event TBA Soon!

August 19, 2016

ALUMNI: Submit your updates!

AwardsPsychology alumni: We want to hear what you’ve been up to! Send us updates about new projects, positions, awards, developments, etc., using THIS FORM, and we’ll include them in the annual departmental newsletter. Please submit by the end of August to be included in that year’s  newsletter. We’re looking forward to reading about what you’re up to!

July 27, 2016

College of Arts and Sciences Award Winners

AwardsRecipients of 2016-17 CAS Scholarships are:

Carolyn M. Stokes Memorial Scholarship: Colton Christian
Clarence and Lucille Dunbar Scholarships: Danielle Cosme, Erik Knight, Marcus Mayorga, Matthew Robison
Marthe E. Smith Memorial Science Scholarship: Kathryn Iurino

Congrats to our award-winning graduate students!

Prof Srivastava’s Research Featured in CAScade

What's in a Tweet?

Prof. Sanjay Srivastava’s collaborative NIH-funded research on mental health and social media are featured in this quarter’s CAScade magazine:

Srivastava studies how personality affects and is affected by the social environment. He said outcomes of the project could include information about how mental health indicators vary over time and between communities and regions; how major events such as disasters and mass shootings affect community mental health; and how social media might be used for individual-level screening and diagnosis.

“There are mental health variables that are common experience—depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress,” Srivastava said. “We’re interested in individuals but also, at a more collective level, communities. What kind of difficulties are they having, and can we use that to do better health research and policies?”

July 5, 2016

Robyn L. Gobin (PhD, 2012) Named 2016 Judy E. Hall Early Career Psychologist Award Winner

Robyn Gobin

Robyn Gobin (PhD, 2012) has won the 2016 Judy E. Hall Early Career Psychologist Award

At the National Register’s spring meeting, the Board of Directors voted to present the 2016 Judy E. Hall, PhD, Early Career Psychologist Award to Robyn L. Gobin, PhD.

The award is named after Judy E. Hall, PhD, the Executive Officer of the National Register from 1990 to 2013. The award recognizes excellence in a National Register credentialed psychologist with fewer than ten years of postdoctoral experience, and the associated $2,500 stipend supports a project that advances the mission, vision, and values of the National Register.

Congrats, Robin!

June 23, 2016

Prof Azim Shariff’s work on driverless cars in Science and the NYT

By IYAR Rahwan/M.I.T. on Publish Date June 23, 2016

Dilemma of Driverless Cars. By IYAR Rahwan/M.I.T. on Publish Date June 23, 2016

Azim Shariff’s latest Science paper, “The social dilemma of autonomous vehicles,” discusses the moral dilemmas presented by driverless cars. See the writeup in the New York Times here:

People say that one day, perhaps in the not-so-distant future, they’d like to be passengers in self-driving cars that are mindful machines doing their best for the common good. Merge politely. Watch for pedestrians in the crosswalk. Keep a safe space.

A new research study, however, indicates that what people really want to ride in is an autonomous vehicle that puts its passengers first. If its machine brain has to choose between slamming into a wall or running someone over, well, sorry, pedestrian.

In this week’s Science magazine, a group of computer scientists and psychologists explain how they conducted six online surveys of United States residents last year between June and November that asked people how they believed autonomous vehicles should behave. The researchers found that respondents generally thought self-driving cars should be programmed to make decisions for the greatest good.

Sort of. Through a series of quizzes that present unpalatable options that amount to saving or sacrificing yourself — and the lives of fellow passengers who may be family members — to spare others, the researchers, not surprisingly, found that people would rather stay alive.

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